Publications & Datasets

WHRC engages in science for impact that includes communicating the findings of our research and recommendations to the public and the policy community. Our scientists are engaged in the climate change conversation through events, media and policy engagement.

Monthly Newsletter

  Newsletter of Woods Hole Research Center
It begins badly
Brazilian government gives WHRC research station national status
Biomass energy legislation dies in congress
Accolades for Senior Scientist Rich Birdsey
IPCC nominates R.A. Houghton to help plan special report
National Academy of Sciences names Phil Duffy to review committee
Helen Spaulding, 1928 – 2016
WHRC panel on post-election climate landscape
WHRC in the news
Help by making your voice heard

Canopy Magazine & Annual Reports

   Canopy Magazine
Wildfire and climate change
Mapping nature’s climate solutions
Can science save Congo’s forests?
New Amazon forest monitoring program launches
ABoVE and beyond
Yukon River Delta imaging
From WHRC to the United Nations
WHRC on the road: sharing our research with the world
Financial reports

President’s Blog

  It begins badly
With the nomination of a fossil-fuel executive to head the State Department—the agency that manages US participation in the United Nations climate process—and climate change deniers to head the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DoE)…


WHRC Overview Brochure: web viewing version or printable version

This brochure provides a good overview of the work we do.

Policy Briefs

WHRC creates policy briefs to provide the climate policy community the scientific data they require.

Understanding Climate Change: A Primer

This primer provides a broad overview of the main issues of Climate Change. Additional resources and more specific information are available throughout the Our Work section of this website.
– The Greenhouse Effect
– Climate Change Fundamentals
– Human Impacts on Climate Change
– Climate Change Consequences
– References

Global Carbon Cycle Primer

There is a natural greenhouse effect when carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and other gases trap heat in the atmosphere and warm the Earth. The concentrations of these gases remained relatively constant from the 700s to the 1700s – the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Since then, greenhouse gas concentrations have risen 44%, raising the Earth’s mean global temperature by 1.4°F.

Datasets

Older datasets are available for access and/or download. Some will require registration, as stipulated by the grant supporting the project or by agreement with collaborating organizations.